• Updated

It is astonishing, if not altogether surprising, that more than two weeks after the Sergeants Benevolent Association issued a tweet referring to Health Commissioner Oxiris Barbot as "this bitc…

  • Updated

It's hard to imagine that a local transportation agency could decide this was the right time to end unlimited sick leave for its workers, but the Port Authority has apparently done just that f…

In responding to the de Blasio administration's decision to suspend in-person testing for city jobs indefinitely, Organization of Staff Analysts Chairman Bob Croghan called it a logical move g…

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has made clear he'd prefer not to deal with a new stimulus bill until sometime this summer, and is decidedly reluctant to include any help for states and…

By any reckoning, in any context, Health Commissioner Oxiris Barbot's remark that "I don't give two rats' asses about your cops" when pressed to supply 500,000 protective masks for police offi…

As blue-state/red-state differences surface in the battle over stimulus aid for localities, worthwhile points were made in a May 14 op-ed in the Daily News by Congressman Max Rose and State Se…

When City Councilman Brad Lander recently called for postponement of a scheduled police class to avoid classroom cuts at the Department of Education and Police Benevolent Association President…

The leadership of the Correction Officers' Benevolent Association, in the wake of the surprising rejection of a tentative contract deal in late March, has agreed to new terms with Labor Commis…

The decision by Governor Cuomo, in a rare collaboration with Mayor de Blasio, to shut down subway service from 1 to 5 a.m. starting May 6 to allow for daily cleaning of trains and removal of t…

Nicole Gelinas, a senior fellow at the conservative Manhattan Institute, is usually a valuable critic of government's excesses and follies, with her analysis generally cutting across ideologic…

Among the more-disturbing aspects of the high death rate for Metropolitan Transportation Authority workers tied to the coronavirus is that of the first 83 victims, all but one of them were ass…

It's not clear whether Rick Bright, the official who had been in charge of the Federal initiative to develop a coronavirus vaccine, was removed from that job, as he alleged, because he was mor…

The city's correction-officer unions are complaining that they don't feel supported by the agency's bosses, in ways that range from the hard time they say they're having getting personal prote…

It was telling when a veteran NY1 anchor responded to the news that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority had granted a $500,000 death benefit to employees who died of the coronavirus by t…

Even as the coronavirus-related daily death rate in New York State consistently topped 700 for much of the past week after a weekend in which it twice fell below 600, there were some encouragi…

The coronavirus continues to take a grim toll on the city and state even while spreading at an alarming rate through parts of the nation that previously hadn't been much affected. Some of thos…

The Police Benevolent Association has begun paying visits to the medical staff at hospitals around the five boroughs, bringing food and refreshments as a way of saying thanks.

As New York State completed its first week of shelter-in-place regulations limiting the movements of most residents, there were signs of headway being made in dealing with the coronavirus. 

Garrett Goble, a 36-year-old subway Operator, died March 27 of injuries he suffered while leading riders to safety on the 110th Street platform after a fire on his No. 2 train.

It’s important to keep in mind, in the wake of Governor Cuomo’s March 20 decision to impose a form of shelter-in-place statewide that would take full effect two nights later that this was not …