City Child Protective Specialist Jobs Open Starting at $50,757

Apply and Take Test By Jan. 31; $68 Fee; Bachelor's Degree Required; Residency is Not

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The city is accepting applications for Child Protective Specialists to investigate complaints of possible child abuse or neglect. The application and test-taking deadline is Jan. 31. The application fee is $68.

Duties

The minimum salary is $50,757  per year. After incumbents complete six months of training and experience, the pay increases to $53,519. After an 18-month probationary period, the salary climbs to $57,070.

Child Protective Specialists, under supervision and with varying levels of latitude for independent action, investigate and take appropriate action in response to allegations of child neglect and/or abuse received by the Administration for Children’s Services.

They complete investigations of alleged child neglect and/or abuse within mandated time frames, and as part of their investigation interact with a variety of involved parties, including birth families, the community, law enforcement, hospital and school staff, and the Family Court.

Child Protective Specialists observe and take notes during visits and interviews to make accurate safety assessments, which are entered into the record. They make recommendations and testify in court. Child Protective Specialists may be required to work shifts including nights, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, as well as unexpected overtime.

Travel Throughout City

They travel to and from assignments throughout the city, including to homes, schools, hospitals and Family Court.

To qualify, applicants must have, or plan to earn by Jan. 31, a bachelor’s degree that includes or is supplemented by 24 semester credits in one or a combination of the following fields: social work, psychology, sociology, human services, criminal justice, education (including early-childhood), nursing or cultural anthropology. At least 12 credits must have been in one of these disciplines.

They must pass a drug screening before being hired. They will also have their names checked against the statewide child-abuse register and the list of problematic caregivers maintained by the Vulnerable Persons Central Register. For some assignments, they will also need a physical exam that includes a tuberculin test and possibly a chest X-ray.

Applicants who speak a foreign language and/or know American Sign Language may be considered for appointment to positions requiring those abilities through a process called Selective Certification. Those passing a qualifying test may be given preferred consideration for positions that require those aptitudes.

Applicants will be given a multiple-choice test at a computer terminal.

The Exam

Questions may require the use of any of the following abilities: reading comprehension, writing ability, sensitivity to existing or developing problems, following rules or arranging objects in the proper order, and deductive and deductive reasoning.

A passing score is 70 percent. Those passing the test will have their names placed in final score order on an eligible list and be given a list number. Those who meet all requirements and conditions will be considered for appointment when their name is reached on the eligible list, which typically remains active for four years.

Complete information on qualifications, application requirements and procedures is available at www1.nyc.gov/site/dcas/employment/how-can-you-find-upcoming-exams.page. The exam number is 0330.


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